Federal Budget 2024: How much of your money is being spent on foreign conflicts – as Albo’s government commits $120million to resettle migrants and refugees in Australia

Taxpayers are shelling out hundreds of millions on foreign conflicts, with an added $120million scheme to resettle migrants and refugees on Australian soil. 

Treasurer Jim Chalmers announced in his Budget on Tuesday night that more than $230million has been pledged to support ‘peacekeeping activities’ in foreign conflicts over the next three years.

Over half of that – $144million – will go to Ukraine, including $100million for drones, generators, inflatable boats and other military equipment and $43.5million for short range air defence systems.

Ukraine was invaded by Russia in February 2022 and has been locked in an intractable war ever since.      

Treasurer Jim Chalmers announced in his Budget on Tuesday night that over $230million has been pledged to support 'peacekeeping activities' in foreign conflicts over the next three years - over half that will go to Ukraine (pictured: Prime Minister Anthony Albanese meeting Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky in 2022)

Treasurer Jim Chalmers announced in his Budget on Tuesday night that over $230million has been pledged to support ‘peacekeeping activities’ in foreign conflicts over the next three years – over half that will go to Ukraine (pictured: Prime Minister Anthony Albanese meeting Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky in 2022)

In February, Anthony Albanese said that ‘Australia remains steadfast in supporting Ukraine to defend itself against Russia’s illegal and immoral invasion’.

‘We stand with Ukraine in support of its courageous people and also in defence of a fundamental principle – the right of every sovereign nation to be secure in its own borders and to determine its own future,’ the Prime Minister added.

Meanwhile, a total of $13.2million will go towards the Hamas-Israel conflict, including $12.2million on Operation BEECH to deploy Australian Defence Force soldiers to support Aussie citizens and foreign nationals in the region.

Around $1million will be spent on 140 aerial delivery parachutes to Jordan and the United Arab Emirates to held deliver humanitarian aid to civilians in Gaza. 

Closer to home, the government will spend $120.9million over the next on improving the settlement of migrants and refugees within Australia.

The lion’s share of this money will go towards the Humanitarian Settlement Program, which helps those who have had their lives torn apart by war resettle and integrate in Australia. 

The government will also provide almost $3million over two years to support individuals and their families from 'significantly affected areas of Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories' (pictured: a Palestinian boy watches as people search through the rubble of a collapsed building destroyed in an Israeli air strike on May 14)

The government will also provide almost $3million over two years to support individuals and their families from ‘significantly affected areas of Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories’ (pictured: a Palestinian boy watches as people search through the rubble of a collapsed building destroyed in an Israeli air strike on May 14)

Support will also be given to youth services and English conversational classes.

The government will also provide almost $3million over two years to support individuals and their families from ‘significantly affected areas of Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories’. 

It will include $2million to the Australian Red Cross to provide emergency financial assistance to migrants. 

A further $900,000 will go towards extending Medicare eligibility until June next year for bridging visa-holders arriving from affected regions in Israel and Palestine.

The government has also extended its duty exemption for Ukrainian goods to July 2026.

This was introduced in response to Russia’s invasion of the country in February 2022. Government economists estimate it will cost around $2million over the 5 years in lost taxes.

Dr Chalmers said on Tuesday night that the government was spending $50.3billion over the next decade as part of the National Defence Strategy.

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