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Finding the Right OSHA Training Program Safety training is an indispensable part of several workplaces as it helps to save lives as well as control job-related injuries.Safety training is an essential part of varied workplaces and helps in saving lives and minimizing work-related injuries. A lot of workers contact OSHA trainers or training companies, inquiring which course would be the best for their needs. Truth is, this question is best answered by employers. They are legally responsible for providing a workplace that is free from hazards, so they need to work with their employees in determining the type of training that will be necessary. Below are valuable tips that can help them make a wise OSHA program choice: Who Should Get OSHA Training?
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Workers can mostly benefit from OSHA safety training, and OSHA standards impose on employers a variety of important training requirements. But particular training programs and requirements are typically determined by the employer or the work site itself. Such requirements are different for each workplace, because every employee will face different hazards (hence, different OSHA training standards apply), depending on the tasks they perform. In most cases employers use a 10 or 30-hour Hazard Recognition training program as a baseline, and they will simply add job-specific safety training as necessary.
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Although OSHA does not require any particular training course, there are jurisdictions or employers having stricter requirements for which programs they accept. As a worker, you can approach your employer or local government to make sure the program you pick is the right one for you. Construction vs.General Industry OSHA Training There are two common types of OSHA training — Construction Industry and General Industry, which includes specialized topics related to the chosen industry. Employers typically instruct their employees which training program they will need, so if you have no idea, do contact your boss and have him make the choice for you. According to OSHA, “construction work” is any work that is involved in construction, repair and alteration, including decorating and painting. General Industry covers any industry that isn’t considered under construction, maritime or agriculture, including but not limited to warehousing, retail and distribution, manufacturing, healthcare, and the rest. Because these are taken straight from OSHA standards, such descriptions are the best guides to knowing which course would be the most suitable for your job; but another choice you have is to know the types of topics each course includes, and decide which are the most useful for the kind of work and workplace you have. Short or Extended Course? The 10-Hour OSHA training program is enough for several entry-level workers, but the actual requirements will be based on what your company wants. The 30-Hour OSHA training is typically recommended for managerial or supervisory positions having some kind of safety responsibility. The extended course not only goes deeper into the topics, but also covers a wider array of subjects.